Better Know an Artist (Vol 34): Katrina Cain (TOMKAT)

TOMKAT is a band out of Denton, Texas, making dreamy electro pop with touches of jazz and soul. They’re fronted by the golden-tressed and golden-piped Katrina (AKA Kat) Cain. Her voice melts on top of the textured electronics to create a slicked up pop dreamscape. Katrina took the time out from dying her hair to answer our questions. Enjoy!

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

KC: The first time I performed in public, I was four years old. I knew pretty much immediately that I wanted to be a professional musician, and specifically a vocalist. I’ve always known it’s what I wanted to do. Throughout my childhood, I played quite a few different instruments and sang everywhere I could (I was a band, orchestra, choir nerd). I eventually majored in Jazz Studies at the University of North Texas, which is how I started actually gigging and making money. It’s also where I met all the guys in the band. All of us moved to Texas to study music at UNT, and we’ve ended up staying here because of the DFW music scene.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

KC:  I’ve always had trouble classifying our music because I feel like it could fall into several genres. I like to say it’s electro groove pop. We hope people can dance and chill out to our music.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

KC: My early songwriter self was influenced by artists like Tori Amos and Fiona Apple. But this current band, TOMKAT, is a mix of all of our influences. I would say we are influenced by artists like Little Dragon, Banks, Polica, and Haitus Kaiyote.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

KC: Our song, “Big Love”, means the most to me because it’s the first song I wrote for this band. Well, the first song I wrote for us that ended up recorded and performed. It’s actually not about love and not about drugs (like it seems), but it’s a metaphor for the music industry. Basically, an obsession or addiction that I can’t stay away from, but sometimes it feels like it’s killing me. My current favorite song is “Icarus”, which we haven’t recorded yet, but we open every show with it. It’s pretty much the story of Icarus, and again just a huge metaphor for being excited/scared to pursue your dreams. The last lines of the song are, “What if I fly, and if I fly too high, what if I fall?”

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

KC: Oh, damn. “Dead or alive” makes it hard to narrow down…if we could open for Little Dragon one day, I would be on top of the world. That’s when I’ll have achieved my definition of success. They’ve been one of my favorite bands since I first heard them…I was maybe 18 or 19 when a friend told me to check them out. It’s great to see their progress and how far they have come. In my opinion, they are one of the freshest, most innovative bands out there– without being so “out” that it drives the mainstream listeners away. They do a great job of balancing unique sounds and concepts with feel good grooves. Everything they release just blows me away.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

KC: Our guitarist’s new band, Terra Collective, is blowing us away recently. Sorry for the plug, but they’re doing some cool things. Polica is a band from the twin cities up in Minnesota. They’ve been around for a few years, but don’t get as much credit as they should. I’m excited to see where they go. I look up to them a lot.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

KC: I honestly don’t want to answer this question, because there are so many records I could name.

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

KC: I love how different each scene is- I truly feel like Denton, Dallas, and Fort Worth each have a unique vibe and their own unique fan bases to offer. I love Deep Ellum. I love how much studio work there is here. Any negative experiences I have had here, I have also had in every other city we’ve played, so I’m not sure that there are any negatives about the DFW scene in particular. Houston has so far been the least welcoming city as far as other bands/artists, venues, booking shows, etc.

I will say in general: I wish more people were willing to go out and see live music, to tip the musicians and/or just pay the cover charge. I’m a big spoiled because my “day job” is also playing music (at swanky restaurants and weddings), but honestly it’s a bit ridiculous to think that we should offer our profession for free anywhere. Even when it’s original music….especially when it’s original music! No one ever says, “Oh, I thought that haircut and dye would be free. No thanks, then.” So why do people turn back around when they get to the club door and there’s a small cover charge? I promise you it will be worth the $5!

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

KC: So far, Trees takes the cake. We had the opportunity to play during the Pin Show’s preview event at Trees in December of 2015 and it was amazing. Really hoping we can play there again. Every show I’ve seen there has been incredible. They book some of my favorite acts, and the sound is always fantastic. I also want to give a shoutout to Jimmy at Dan’s Silver Leaf in Denton for being the best sound guy I’ve ever worked with. He’s also the crankiest, and you can tell him I said that, he knows I love him.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

KC: Absolutely in love with the band Relick, and have always loved hearing Isaac Hoskins play. We also adore playing shows with Rat Rios and Sudie, so check them out as well!

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

KC: My name is Kat, but I like dogs. I am left-handed. I have never done karaoke.

Many thanks to Kat for taking the time to do this for us. I don’t think TomKat has any local dates upcoming. They’re in Houston and Austin the next couple days. For now, you can listen to their track, “Big Love”, below, and pick up the EP here. Keep an eye out for TomKat dates here.

 

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New Music: Pageantry “Vicious Wishes”

Check out this groovy new track from Denton’s Pageantry. It’s called “Vicious Wishes” and it’s like Flaming Lips meet New Wave. Pretty freaking cool. It’s the lead track off of their upcoming EP, set for release on July 11 on Southern Heaven Records. The official release show will be at Dan’s Silver Leaf on July 16.

 

Better Know an Artist (Vol 29): Charlie Beaman (ABACABA, Pearl Earl)

So, a while back, I did a Better Know an Artist with Ariel Hartley, lead singer of the excellent Denton psych-rock band, Pearl Earl. Well, 2 members of that band, Charlie Beaman and Bailey Chapman (along with Benjamin and Taylor Copeland), also moonlight with Denton garage band, ABACABA, who just released an excellent self-titled LP. Charlie (keys) took some time to answer our timeless questions, and that went something like this:

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

CB: I was born in Midwest City, OK, and moved to Texas at age 6. I took piano lessons at a young age and then stopped because I became bored of it. At 12, I received my first bass and began playing birthday parties and other small events with other kids from school. My first venue to play at was the Curtain Club in Deep Ellum, TX. Right then, I knew I wanted to play music for the rest of my life, and since have. At age 16, I picked back up keys and that’s what I mainly play now.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

CB: I would describe ABACABA as Garage/Prog without the 4 minute jams for each instrument, but carries an almost cinematic feel.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

CB: Harry Nilsson, David Bowie, Medeski, Martin and Wood, pretty much all of Josh Homme’s projects, and Ween. The way Ween puts together their albums is fascinating to me.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

CB: “Grumpy Couch”, just because it’s nostalgic for me. It was written about a coach that was used for timeout when I was living with my older cousins and one of their young sons. It was a song that had been in my mind for a long time before it all came together. I am pretty proud of it.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

CB: Ween

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

CB: I’m starting to play bass and be part of a new group called Particular People. It’s a mix of a lot of different musicians coming in and recording their own parts to each song. It’s been a really fun process.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

CB: Ween’s White Pepper

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

CB: I honestly have no complaints. In the past 2 years that I’ve been back, everyone, whether it be Fort Worth, Dallas, Denton has been very nice and welcoming. 35 sucks to drive south on. That’s about it.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

CB: 3 Links. Great staff, stage and sound.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

CB: Particular People, Pearl Earl, Mink Coats, Cozy Hawks, Criminal Birds, Dead Mockingbirds, Sealion, Party Static, Lochness Mobsters, the Aquaholics.

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

CB: I can talk to all animals except fish.

There you have it, folks. Shout out to Reverse Aquaman Charlie Beaman for taking time out of his day playing with every band in town. Go find you an ABACABA show or a Pearl Earl show or, you know whatever he’s doing that day, and check out the new record below.

 

BKA TBT (2/18): Daniel Markham

TBT Update: Daniel (as always) is a busy bee, so there’s always shows to announce for him, but this weekend are a couple rarer ones for him. Friday night, he’ll be making a Fort Worth appearance at Fred’s opening for Jake Paleschic along with Austin’s Carson McHone. It starts at 8, and it’s free, so you Funkytown folks have no excuse (unless you’re me and your little ones are up screaming). Saturday, he’s back at home at the usual stomping grounds, Dan’s Silver Leaf along with the excellent Birds of Night, opening for the great Alejandro Escovedo. A little further down the line, he’ll be performing a free show with Claire Morales (performing Harmony in Hell) at Brass Tacks Barbershop (John Kuzmick & Leah Lane support). Then, later in March, he’ll be appearing at Denton’s answer to SxSw, 35 Denton (the amazing Charles Bradley will be headlining the main stage this year). So, plenty of chances to catch one of DFW’s rising stars.

Daniel Markham, a true rock-n-roll singer/songwriter from Denton, crafts sounds that recall sounds from all over the rock spectrum, from Nirvana to R.E.M. to Toadies and Guns N Roses, with an occasional hint of alt-country (because, Texas). Definitely, an artist I would have been all over back in my high school and college days. I think he’s going to be a bright spot on our local music scene for a while. Daniel sat down (on his birthday, no less) to answer our overly repetitive questions.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

DM: My grandfather started playing guitar again later on in his life. I was playing the Alto Sax in band at the time, but I loved Nirvana. He taught me how to play chords. He bought me a guitar for my 12th birthday. After that, I never looked back. I never thought about making money with music, but I’m very fortunate that I get to!

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

DM: I’d just call it Rock & Roll.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

DM: I like so many bands. R.E.M. is my favorite. I love Black Metal and Doom bands. I also like Lana Del Rey. I dunno. I love it all, I guess.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

DM: I wrote a song called “Downhill” for a dear friend who passed away. I wanted to write a song that made him a super hero. I still love playing it.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

DM: R.E.M., Pantera, or Buddy Holly. I think our music would fit with any of that stuff.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

DM: I love so much music. DFW is blessed with a great music scene.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

DM: Failure’s Fantastic Planet

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

DM: I like that there are so many great bands working hard to make great music. I kinda hate how self-congratulatory it can all be, though. I don’t know.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

DM: Dan’s Silverleaf is my home. They’ve treated me like a king since I moved here. It’s the best sounding room. I couldn’t live without Dan’s and everyone involved with it.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

DM: Siamese, Claire Morales, Bawcomville, and Jake Paleschic

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

DM: I’m probably wearing Superman underwear most of the time.

Thanks a bunch to Daniel Markham for getting this back to me so promptly and giving some really informative answers. I feel like we really got to the heart of this emerging artist. Keep an eye out. Daniel will be performing at Sundown at Granada Theater on Dec 4. Get tickets here and check out his most recent album, Pretty Bitchin’ below, along with his recent Halloween record with Claire Morales, Harmony in Hell.

Photo Credit: Karlo X. Ramos

BKA #TBT: Claire Morales

TBT Notes: You can catch Claire this Saturday at Sundown at Granada (for free). Carry on…..

Claire Morales is an intriguing young singer-songwriter from Denton. A music fan as far back as she can remember, she learned guitar at 11, and started playing shows at 13, so she’s set herself up for the long haul in the scene. Claire released her debut album, Amaranthine, in early 2015. Claire sat down to talk about ice cream and Thai food (I don’t think I asked about those things, but ok) in our Better Know an Artist interview.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

CM: I’ve been into music for as long as I can remember. When I was 3, I would force my friends and family to listen to me while I stood on the fireplace and sang Little Mermaid and Carol King songs. I bet there are pictures of this somewhere. My dad would play guitar and I would sing as I got older. I remember insisted that we play “Blowing in the Wind” by Bob Dylan for my 4th grade talent show and “To Sir with Love” for the 5th grade show (a very emotional goodbye to elementary school). I learned to play guitar when I was 11 and started playing shows when I was 13. I’ve always wanted to do this for a living. It was way easier to say money be damned when I was 5, but I’m still trying to follow that little kid dream.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

CM: It is like eating ice cream and both fondly recalling your youth and also vaguely fearing your eventual demise. I’m really bad with genres. I guess I would call it lyrically driven, melodic, unicorn-y dream rock. But that sounds just as silly as the bit I just wrote about ice cream.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

CM: I’m very inspired by musicians I’ve seen locally and played shows with. Friends are big influences for me. As far as other acts: Angel Olsen, Patsy Cline, Beirut, the Shins, Sibylle Baier, Built to Spill, REM, Hank Williams, Nancy Sinatra, Leonard Cohen and Laura Marling are some big ones. I’m really attracted to beautiful music with strong lyrics, and I feel like I learn a lot technique-sie from singers I love. i actually find myself being really inspired by literature as well, as far as lyrics go. I find myself thinking of Greek mythology and also some of my favorite authors when I write (Salinger, Camus, TS Eliot, Dostoyevsky). Whew! That was longwinded.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

CM: Hmm. I’m going to say that the song that means the most to me is usually the most recent one I’ve written. I write songs that are very personal. Not all of them are about me or my life, but they are about what I believe in and feel strongly about, so the latest one is usually the closest to where i’m at.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

CM: Probably Leonard Cohen. He’s just such a wonderful songwriter. I’d love to play an acoustic-y show with him.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

CM: La Luz, Shana Cleveland and the Sandcastles, Courtney Barnett, Oh Rose, and Sharon Van Etten come to mind. There are so many others I’m sure.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

CM: Burn Your Fire for No Witness by Angel Olsen. Clearly, I dig her.

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

CM: My favorite thing about this scene is all the great music. My least favorite thing is not being able to keep all that great music here. I feel like the Denton scene is in a bit of a valley right now. Successful bands tend to leave for bigger towns with better opportunities. There are very few local labels that are able to financially support bands. More and more clubs are closing and struggling in Denton, which means fewer places to play. House shows have died down. The music festivals we’ve been hosting in Denton are really good, but they happen once a year. There isn’t a lot of industry in town, which makes it hard to have a solid day job and be a musician. As a scene, we need to figure out how to keep awesome musicians around. I think a part of the problem is just having fewer people who are interested in seeing live music and especially local bands. It’s a big struggle and a frustrating one, because I think there’s a real opportunity here that’s slipping away more and more. I don’t have clear solutions, but I’m trying to figure out ways to help make things better and bring people out to shows. Hopefully, you’ll see some of those efforts in 2016.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

CM: So far, I think it’s Dan’s. I’ve gone there since I was pretty young, and there’s something so warm and intimate about it. Also, the sound is stellar, the art is lovely, the bartenders are friendly, and it’s in walking distance to a couple of excellent Thai food restaurants. I’m very driven by food.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

CM: A few favorite North and Central Texas acts: Jena Pyle (in all her various musical endeavors), New Science Projects, Daniel Markham, Pageantry, Pearl Earl, the Deer, Jesse Gage, Gollay, the Baptist Generals, Reservations, Lomelda, Dollie Barnes, Spooky Folk, Chinaski the Fury, The Angelus, Danny Diamonds, Ryan Thomas Becker, Grace London… I’m sure I’m forgetting people who are really rad and influential. There are always so many new and cool acts. I’m realizing that more and more. Everyone should just get out and go to shows. You’ll find some great music in no time, I promise.

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

CM: Hmm, I hate melon! I think a lot of people know that one actually.

Thanks to Claire Morales for letting us get to the (super) quirky underbelly of her musical soul. Keep an eye out for Claire at the Thai restaurants in Denton, or you know, maybe she’ll play a show, and check out Amaranthine below. Either way, she’s probably, like, your favorite person right now, so show her some love.

Photo Credit: Jasmyne Rose (jasmynerose.com)

Better Know an Artist (Vol 14): Ariel Hartley (of Pearl Earl)

Denton’s Pearl Earl are a band on the rise. A fuzzy girl-pop band saw 2015’s Karaoke Superstar EP draw rave reviews and attention on several local year end lists. They have a good sound and are a bit different than what you see in the scene around these parts. Pearl Earl’s frontwoman, Ariel Hartley, sat down with us to answer the usual questions.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

AH: My brother taught me the typical Deep Purple riff on guitar when I was in 6th grade but I didn’t really catch on to playing yet. From a really early age, I always wrote poems and lyrics but I never thought I could sing well so I never thought of turning it into something more than this weird girly collection of lyrical poems. On a random night when I was 19, my good friend, Julia, taught me my first guitar chords and that was the first time where I really felt an igniting passion for something happen and knew that this was something I had to pursue. I took it and ran with it and taught myself how to write songs on guitar.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

AH: I would describe it as poppy psychedelic influenced garage rock with feel happy parts and some dark parts with some funk and glam and warbles and fuzziness.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

AH: My first concert was the B-52’s when I was 11 or 12 in Central Park, and I grew up listening to them with my mom so they are probably an influence whether I wanted them to be or not. I also really liked the Doors growing up because of the organ. I definitely have a thing for organs. Another influence would be Air because I love their French space disco synth groove thing going on (especially their bass lines) and I would mention an album I really vibe with is MGMT’s sophomore album Congratulations because it’s weird and dark and kind of Halloweeny. Pond is also one of my favorite bands of all time, but I feel like I talk about them way too much so I’ll stop there.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

AH: Hmmmm… it kind of changes everyday because one day I hate a song I wrote and the other I’ll be like yeah! But lyrically I think the most important would be “If”, because that’s the one I feel like I sing well in and I guess you could say it’s my more vulnerable lover side that I don’t really show much in our songs and I like the playful whiskey pick me up part about feeling empty or down, because the yearning for love can definitely make you feel lonely sometimes.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

AH: Pink Floyd with Syd Barrett, because that would be strange.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

AH: I just started listening to Wand from California and they are cool. King Grizzard and the Lizard Wizard are awesome too. Globe Lamp put out an album recently and it’s really good.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

AH: ummm, the Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust would do

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

AH: I like the 3 main cities (Dallas, Denton, Fort Worth) that are only like 30 minutes from each other, and how they all have their different scenes, but everyone knows each other and are all definitely an intertwined community of bands and musicians. I don’t like how small Denton is sometimes as far as the places to play, house shows seem to have the most successful shows. There’s just so many bands within a small radius that I’ve seen a lot of really awesome acts come through that play to like 5 people because everyone would rather go to a house show down the street for free. House shows are more fun and relaxed for sure. I do like that we have so many of them.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

AH: I really like Harvest House in the warmer months because it’s outside and the sound is good and I love everyone that works there. But, Three Links is a good one too, they have great sound, and it’s partially outside when they pull the cover up!

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

AH: Sunbuzzed (they have only played a show or two), Siamese, Claire Morales, Delia Haunt, ABACABA, Mink Coats, Bad Beats, the Noids, Josh Serrano’s multiple projects, Dead Mockingbirds, Party Static, Son of Stan, a million others…….

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

AH: I have an alter ego as a rapper and I make beats as a proud member of Gross Bitch and the Sour Patch Klitz and I hate cilantro.

Thanks to Ariel for doing this interview and check out Pear Earl when you get the chance. They’ll be performing at the Foundry on Feb 6. You can check out their awesome 2015 EP, Karaoke Superstar, below.

 

Better Know an Artist (Vol 13): Matthew Gray (Matthew and the Arrogant Sea)

When I first started this series, one of the first big supporters I got in the local scene was Matthew Gray, which was super cool to me, because when I started venturing out and listening to more music, his band, Matthew and the Arrogant Sea, were just starting to get buzz and a lot of airplay on the Local Show and in the local rags. All these years later, and Matt’s taking appreciation to what I’m doing. Kinda cool. So, I reached out to Matt to see if he wanted to play along, so here we are, lucky #13.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

MG: I started playing music with my little brother and nephews in Broken Arrow, OK, back in the late 90’s. I grew up in a house full of singers (and pickers). Not a’ one of us had ever been classically or traditionally trained, but that didn’t stop us from trying. Most of my sisters and my mother were wedding singers. I remember at an early age seeing my mother perform at a wedding using only an Omnichord as her backing band. Even then, I remember being astounded at her confidence. It was in that moment that I knew I wanted to be that person on stage taking chances.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

MG: I believe that the only true form of time travel, and exploration of the mind and heart, is through songwriting. It’s an arduous and extraordinary journey. I would say, listen with an open heart. Listen with a head full of stars, flat on your back in the grass. That’s when it all makes sense.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

MG: My hero will forever remain with the words of Eef Barzleay. He’s rather underrated, and terribly under-appreciated, but he has a kill shot like no other songwriter I have ever heard.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

MG: When I first moved to Denton, TX, I was pretty confused about myself, and the direction of my life. I spent a great deal of time damning the stars above me. I was a most unique anomaly to myself. Then one day, I dreamt in great detail, a wild and unashamed young man in a pink suit, appearing before my very eyes. He told me: “There is a science to your heart, a science to your eyes, your soul, and every spec of your existence.” I immediately woke up with a bang, and a song in my heart. To me, one of the most important songs I have ever written is a song called, “My Science Fiction Daydream”. The song truly saved my life. I haven’t written a song without the help of my dreams, since.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

MG: A duet with Ozzy Osbourne. Maybe Neil Young would join us for a solo or two? And after I nail the vocal solo on our duet of “Goodbye to Romance,” Ringo Starr would high five me, and I would wake up. Because….it would be awesome.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

MG: Oh, man. I am enthralled by the talented friends (musical family) that I  have the pleasure of being surrounded by. I recently had the pleasure of peeping the new Cantina album, which of course is AMAZING. I’m a nut for uke-pop songs, and killer harmonies. Listen to Cantina!

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

MG: It’s a tie between Diary of a Madman and In the Aeroplane Over the Sea. Hey, let’s do a mashup!

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

MG: Favorite thing will always be the community aspect of the scene. It really is a big family. Where we love and support one another. That love far outweighs anything I would dislike.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

MG: My favorite DFW venue will always be Dan’s Silverleaf. Dan Mojica and his incredible staff will always have 100% of my love, support, and respect. It’s a magical place. That has housed many of my own dream come true performances.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

MG: Listen to: Felt & Fur, Charley Crockett, Vincent Neil Emerson, Andy Pickett, Cliffs of Insanity, Nicholas Altobelli, Cameron Matthew Ray. I could go on for days. Listen to and support local music.

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

MG: I am obsessed with time travel, alien abductions, and David Lynch. I love to write and direct short films, and music videos. I am currently writing and producing a play for the Arrogant Sea. Oh yeah…, I’m actually a certified Sonographer, and full time Cat Dad. Love you guys! Thanks for asking, and for reading along!

Thanks so much to my fellow Matthew for taking time out to hang with us. He truly is an ambassador to our local scene, and look forward to hearing new MATAS output. You can catch Matthew (and Friends) performing a live “reinvention” of his fan favorite album Family Family Family Meets the Magic Christian on Jan 30 at Opening Bell Coffee in Dallas. John Dufilho opens. Refresh yourself on the record below.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1254843107865044/