Better Know an Artist (Vol 18): Lindsay Hightower (Hightower)

One of the first local shows I got out to after a bit of a hiatus was the Grotto’s birthday party a few months back. You might remember me posting pictures of Vodeo, Mountain Kid, and the Hanna Barbarians. However, opening that show, was the band, Hightower. I didn’t quite make it in time to catch most of their set (Asa took a hot minute to go down), but Lindsay’s voice made an impression. I messaged her the next day, and apologized for not getting photos of her, and invited her to this series. Well, she’s got a new album dropping here shortly (I’ve heard it. It’s great) and we’re finally getting around to this interview. Check out what Lindsay has to say and catch her live for the Album release soon (see below).

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

LH: Music was always in our home. My mom played piano and my Dad played guitar. I was 13 when I started performing around local opry houses. Then I was introduced to a vocal coach/manager that mainly focused on kids, Kay Lynn Scott in San Saba, TX. She worked with other kids from rural areas like me and just helped groom us for performing. That continued all throughout high school. After high school, I packed up and went to Nashville, where I attended Belmont University for Music Business. Then, I packed up again and moved to Los Angeles. I submersed myself into training as an actor. I don’t want to say I put music on the back burner as I was still in that world, but I was training heavily as an actor. I moved back here and was in a couple of other bands. They would break up and then I finally though I was done/ burned out… but we’re never really done, are we? I went into the business world, but it just wasn’t who I was. Then I had my “money be damned” moment and jumped back into music full time. That was a little over a year ago.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

LH: I like to say that Hightower is a dark, sultry, campy, Texi-Cali band peppered with the influences of Surf, Country and Rock.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

LH: Etta James, Patsy Cline, Billie Holiday, Amanda Palmer and Nina Simone are just some of the first artists that come to mind. The list goes on. While I was too young to understand exactly what they were saying, it didn’t matter, because the pure emotion in their voices just paralyzed me. I fell in love. I would also like to add the Beatles, Neil Young, and Tom Petty.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

LH: “Echo Spring.” It’s the title track and was the first song written for the album. It was inspired by a book I had read “Trip to Echo Spring”. The term comes from the play “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”. It means I’m going to go “tie one off” or “go on a bender”. While writing “Echo Spring”, I just committed to sit in my feelings and not judge myself for the way I feel, not tie myself to any expectations.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

LH: That’s a really difficult question. I’m gonna go with Elvis.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

LH: For sure. They’re not all new, but first and locally, I like what Sudie is doing. Her videos are really beautiful as well. St Vincent, Dovetail, Charley Crockett, as well. Not so local acts: Phantogram, Jim James & Thievery Corporation are some of my tunes that are on repeat.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

LH: I like different things depending on my moods of course. Right now, I would pick the Beach Boys Pet Sounds album, if I were stranded on an island.

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

LH: There is something really special about Fort Worth. Coming from other markets, the level of community and support was so refreshing. Not one complaint.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

LH: So many great places in DFW. Love all the music staples. Shipping and Receiving has a special place in my heart cause that’s where we started. They welcomed us when we were just starting out. That means a lot.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

LH: Feletha Black melts my face off. They are incredible.

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

LH: I like to scare or prank people. Makes me giggle every time.

Much love to Lindsay Hightower for taking the time. You’re going to want to check out her new album. The girl’s voice is gonna getcha. You can catch her live at the album release at Shipping and Receiving on March 12, with Holy Moly and Conway Seavey, starts at 9. Until then, keep on keeping on and support local music.

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Top Records for February 2016

Alright, after a really weak start to the month of February, this week’s releases finally evened out the list a little bit. I listened to a lot of stuff this month, trying to find something to get way up there, so some decent ones that might have made other months lists won’t make this one. Also, new records from Lucinda Williams and the 1975 are not available on Spotify, and thus I haven’t heard them yet. They may get added in later. With no further ado, here are my top albums of February 2016.

1 Bonnie Raitt “Dig in Deep” 8.3
2 James Hunter Six “Hold On!” 8.2
3 School of Seven Bells “SVIIB” 8.1
4 Quilt “Plaza” 8.1
5 Mothers “When You Walk a Long Distance You Are Tired” 8.0
6 Steve Mason “Meet the Humans” 8.0
7 Elliott Smith “Heaven Adores You (Soundtrack)” 8.0
8 King “We Are King” 8.0
9 Basia Bulat “Good Advice” 7.8
10 Beacon “Escapements” 7.8
11 Mavis Staples “Livin’ On A High Note” 7.8
12 Field Music “Commontime” 7.8
13 Keegan McInroe “Uncouth Pilgrims” 7.8
14 Emma Pollock “In Search of Harperfield” 7.8
15 Waco Brothers “Going Down in History” 7.8
16 BJ the Chicago Kid “In My Mind” 7.8
17 Andrew Weatherall “Convenanza” 7.8
18 Wild Nothing “Life of Pause” 7.7
19 Mount Moriah “How to Dance” 7.7
20 Luke McGlathery “Life Ain’t Hard” 7.7

 

BKA #TBT: Zach Mayo (of the Hendersons)

#TBT Update: Zach and the Hendersons will be playing at the Grotto on Saturday night in support of Daniel and Matt Mabe’s band (with Anthony Sosa), Jefferson Colby (to celebrate Daniel’s birthday), and the return of Bomb Atomic. Should be a pretty kick a– show, so go check it out.

The Hendersons 10:00
Bomb Atomic 11:00
Jefferson Colby 12:00

Fort Worth’s the Hendersons are probably my favorite local band right now. There’s just something different about what they’re doing, but they’re definitely onto something. I think this band is headed for some big things in the near future, so I sent the usual questions over to drummer Zach Mayo to find out what’s going on over there. He had a lot to say. See for yourself. BTW’s, that’s him staring a hole into my soul in that photo above.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

ZM: I’ve always had music in my life. My mother was the Cantor every Sunday at church and can sing like an angel. My father played guitar, and my grandmother was also the Cantor at her church that we would sometimes visit. So, I always had music around me growing up. My older brothers (I’m the youngest of 3 boys) both were in band and played percussion and the French horn. I, however, decided not to follow in their footsteps and joined the orchestra program in the 5th grade to play the bass. Truly, I joined orchestra because I hated singing those lame-ass songs we were forced to sing in “music” class. But, I immediately fell in love with the bass. I was always a big kid growing up, and the bass just fit me perfectly. I started studying theory and performance, and my chops grew leaps-and bounds over the years. I continued playing bass in orchestra throughout my middle, junior, and high school years. All the while, I taught myself how to play guitar drums and the piano.

When I was in the 7th grade, my very good friend, Justin Elliott, started asking me if I wanted to “jam.” At that point, I had never really played “rock” music. I was only used to orchestra and church song arrangements. However, when i started playing with Justin, my entire outlook on music changed. I started playing drums more often, and Justin would play guitar. He was a madman when it came to the six-string, and I felt obligated to be just as much a madman on the drums. We had our two-man band, the Sugarmen, which was a very blues-heavy, garage rock vibe, much like the Black Keys or White Stripes. At the time, Justin was playing lead guitar with the Josh Weathers band and they needed an opening act. Josh was sick, and he didn’t have the will or energy to play for their full 3-hour bar set, so he enlisted me and J to fill in as an opening act. We played our first show at the Moon Bar to a crowd of people that were NOT there to see these two guys – they wanted to see Josh. By the end of our 1-hour set, we had the crowd in our hands. They loved it. After shaking hands with people and having compliments thrown at me left and right, it was then I knew I wanted to do this for a living.

Over the years, I’ve played in tons of different bands with different roles. I can honestly say that there’s nothing out there better than music – playing it, listening to it, practicing it. Every aspect of music plays a huge role in my life, and I wouldn’t want to change it for anything.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

ZM: The Hendersons are kind of hard to pinpoint and describe. Lots of people have told us that they remind them of the Beatles and the Beach Boys. There are also shades of Harry Nilsson and the Kinks. Nolan is the principle songwriter. He’s been influenced by all of the aforementioned bands, as well as a heavy influence of classical music. If you listen to Indian Summer, you might pick up on all of those. Kind of like a throw-back Harry-Nilsson-meets-Brian-Wilson-with-a-dash-of-Beethoven-and-a-sprig-of-Beatles.

Gun to my head, if I had to give the Hendersons a “genre”, I would say it’s Vintage Baroque Pop-rock.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

ZM: I’m influenced by heavy-hitting drummer, Buddy Miles. The man was a beast. He could sing and play drums like a madman! I’m also heavily influenced (drum-wise, that is) by a man named Steven Kleisath. He played drums for a hardcore band called Armstrong, as well as the more-poppy Further Seems Forever. The way he moves around the drum kit showed me that there was much more to playing than just “keeping the beat.”

Nowadays, I find myself watching drum solos all day. Benny Greb, Thomas Pridgen, Mike Johnson, Buddy Rich, Gene Krupa – watching those guys has shown me that drums can also have a melody. I know that sounds weird, but that’s the way I hear it.

My favorite bands span tons of different genres: Queens of the Stone Age, Rage Against the Machine, Ray Lamontagne, AIR, Nickel Creek, Punch Brothers, Ween, G. Love & Special Sauce, Otis Redding, James Brown, Menahan Street Band.

Me: Which of your songs means the most to you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

ZM: I always love playing “Skid Row.” It usually gets everyone dancing and singing along, and I enjoy that very much.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

ZM: The Hendersons don’t necessarily fit a perfect bill these days (especially in rock-heavy Ft. Worth), so I’d have to say that I would have LOVED to have been one of the acts at the Monterey Pop Festival back in 1967. But, only as long as we weren’t the ones following Otis Redding. That fucker brought the house down.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

ZM: I’m a big fan of Vodeo (formerly Shake the Moon). Those guys are super talented and have great hooks. I’m also digging what the fellas in Arenda Light bring to the table. They’re super tight and well-practiced, that’s for sure. And even though, they’re not “new” at all, I spend lots of my time in the car cycling through Wilco records.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

ZM: Tough call. I’d have to say it’s either between Ray Lamontagne’s Trouble or the Beach Boys’ Friends

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

ZM: I’m a big fin of how tight-knit a lot of the bands in FW are. Lots of us party together, share the same bills, and sometimes even share the same band members. It’s nice to feel like part of the “crew.” We’re all working together, doing the thing that we all love to do, and supporting each other along the way. There’s also the opposite side of the spectrum, where it can be difficult to crack into that “circle and be considered an outcast – especially if you’re new to the area and you’re trying to find the right group of people to play music with.

Dallas has always been a tough place to get your exposure to the masses. Every time I’ve played Dallas, it’s been for very few people. So, I guess the way to be known in Dallas is just say “Fuck it” and play for the small crowds as often as possible. Who knows? You may just gain a few more fans along the way.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

ZM: The Grotto. Hands down. It’s kind of like our “home bar.” We usually can pack the house, even on short notice. We also like that we’re allowed to bring in our homemade Frito-pies or Beef Stew for our fans to munch on during dreary, cold evenings. However I really enjoyed playing on the new outdoor stage at Lola’s/Trailer Park. That place is going to be a mainstay for outdoor shows for years to come.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

ZM: Some cat named Leon Bridges is doing pretty well for himself – or so I’ve heard. And Oil Boom is pretty solid. Chingalotus is another band that’s incredible. Cosmic Trigger makes my ears bleed (in the good way). Secret Ghost Champion has a record called Electric Neck and the Mercy Skull that I think EVERYONE should listen to. Jake Paleschic is amazing every single time I see him (and I’m super-jealous of his drummer Peter Wierenga’s snare sound.)

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

ZM: I’ve been taking ballroom dance lessons with my girlfriend, Sarah Jane, for almost 2 years now. That shit is amazing, and does wonders for relationships.

A big thanks to Zach Mayo for taking the time. I think this is the longest post yet. If you haven’t had a chance to catch a Hendersons show, you’re going to want to do that. I have a feeling they’re about to blow up. You can check out their last record, Indian Summer, below, and keep an eye out for new material due next year. On a more somber note, Zach’s old band mate, Justin Elliott, passed away in a household accident last year. His family has established a scholarship fund to benefit local children in their musical and academic endeavors. If you’d like to donate to the fund, you can do so here. The Hendersons will be performing with Jacob Furr at the Grotto this Thursday, the 14th, if you need to catch a great show.

Photo Credit: Moi (yeah, I’m pretty awesome)

Better Know an Artist (Vol 17): Bucky Spangler

Bucky Spangler is a singer-songwriter who now makes his home in the DF-Dubs. He crafts American Folk/pop songs with a contemporary socio-political awareness. His most recent album Why Play Now? was recorded in Dallas in one day, by himself and was recorded, edited, mixed, produced and uploaded in 23 days (not too shabby, huh). Friend of the blog, Taylor Tatsch did the mix and production on it and referred him to us for our fun little questions. Here’s how that went down.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

BS: Every child is born with its personality and world view intact right from day one, right? (Ask any parent.) Mine was/is an artist’s temperament, so the music and art just found their way to me (or I found my way to them. Who knows?). I fell in love with playing music on a record player when I was 3 or 4 years old. It just grew from there.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

BS: It’s unpolished, immediate, topical, sometimes funny, and always very real. Its roots are in the days when popular music mattered – when musicians were our public poets. I still like a tune that tells a story, has something to say, and says it with a bit of literary-ness to make it more interesting. (That all starts with Chuck Berry IMHO.) I can’t find anybody out there today who is doing what I’m doing, which is actually the reason I am doing it. I couldn’t find any new music that was satisfying so I decided I would have to go out and make my own.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

BS: Wa-ay too many to count. My record collection includes a lot of acoustic and electric blues from the 1940s onward. Country music from the 50s and 60s. Rock n’ Roll (of course) and pop songs. 1950s jazz. The Beatles, Frank Zappa, NRBQ, Elvis Costello, Ray Price & the Cherokee Cowboys, Bukka White, Simon & Garfunkel, Nick Lowe, Muddy Waters, Foster & Lloyd, the list goes on and on and on…

Me: Which of your songs means the most to you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

BS: The answer to that changes depending upon what song one most recently wrote, no? Right now, it seems to be “Sleeping With the Enemy.” That one was a fun departure from what came before. It’s got equal parts Peter Green, Bob Dylan and Elvis Costello in its parentage which makes for a clever sort of a mash-up I suppose. I get emails from people who tell me they love it. I am humbled and honored when that happens.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

BS: Paul Simon. He’s probably the gold standard as far as I’m concerned. I know he’s really old now but 30 years ago, had I been ready and able, it would have been a thrill to open for him.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

BS: Some of the coffee house guys I see on Open Mic Night have some really nice tunes. Steve Jackson’s “Goodnight Moon” deserves to be a smash, and no doubt would have been instantly had it been released in 1975. Garrett Owen has that song with the line about “drinking poison from the well.” I like that one too.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

BS: Oh, man. Can’t answer that one. Miles Davis, “Kind of Blue”? Oy yoy yoy, decisions, decisions!

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

BS: As Troy Aikman once famously said, “I’ve always said Dallas isn’t so much a sports town as it is a winner’s town…a lot of the people that attend sports in this town, they’re there because it’s kind of just a place to be seen.” Substitute the word “music” for “sports” and the sentiment holds true, I think. I’ve been to a lot of Dallas shows and Open Mic Nights where the audience talked all the way through the performance. WTF? What I do like about the Dallas scene is that it’s not as self-aware as Austin’s scene. There’s still some innocence here.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

BS: Opening Bell Coffee. Pretty much the only place I like to play in Dallas now. lol (when the audience is listening.)

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

BS: – see question 6 above.

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

BS: That I came to Texas, and have therefore lived my entire adult life here – married, children, career, etc, etc. – completely as a result of a random coin toss. I was in a band in Pennsylvania and we knew we had to get out of there. We had friends in Boston and friends in Houston. So we tossed a coin. Texas won.

Thanks so much to Bucky Spangler for playing along with us. No immediate shows to announce, but maybe you can catch him at an open mic or something. In the meantime, check out his record Why Play Now? below.

BKA TBT (2/18): Daniel Markham

TBT Update: Daniel (as always) is a busy bee, so there’s always shows to announce for him, but this weekend are a couple rarer ones for him. Friday night, he’ll be making a Fort Worth appearance at Fred’s opening for Jake Paleschic along with Austin’s Carson McHone. It starts at 8, and it’s free, so you Funkytown folks have no excuse (unless you’re me and your little ones are up screaming). Saturday, he’s back at home at the usual stomping grounds, Dan’s Silver Leaf along with the excellent Birds of Night, opening for the great Alejandro Escovedo. A little further down the line, he’ll be performing a free show with Claire Morales (performing Harmony in Hell) at Brass Tacks Barbershop (John Kuzmick & Leah Lane support). Then, later in March, he’ll be appearing at Denton’s answer to SxSw, 35 Denton (the amazing Charles Bradley will be headlining the main stage this year). So, plenty of chances to catch one of DFW’s rising stars.

Daniel Markham, a true rock-n-roll singer/songwriter from Denton, crafts sounds that recall sounds from all over the rock spectrum, from Nirvana to R.E.M. to Toadies and Guns N Roses, with an occasional hint of alt-country (because, Texas). Definitely, an artist I would have been all over back in my high school and college days. I think he’s going to be a bright spot on our local music scene for a while. Daniel sat down (on his birthday, no less) to answer our overly repetitive questions.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

DM: My grandfather started playing guitar again later on in his life. I was playing the Alto Sax in band at the time, but I loved Nirvana. He taught me how to play chords. He bought me a guitar for my 12th birthday. After that, I never looked back. I never thought about making money with music, but I’m very fortunate that I get to!

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

DM: I’d just call it Rock & Roll.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

DM: I like so many bands. R.E.M. is my favorite. I love Black Metal and Doom bands. I also like Lana Del Rey. I dunno. I love it all, I guess.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

DM: I wrote a song called “Downhill” for a dear friend who passed away. I wanted to write a song that made him a super hero. I still love playing it.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

DM: R.E.M., Pantera, or Buddy Holly. I think our music would fit with any of that stuff.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

DM: I love so much music. DFW is blessed with a great music scene.

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

DM: Failure’s Fantastic Planet

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

DM: I like that there are so many great bands working hard to make great music. I kinda hate how self-congratulatory it can all be, though. I don’t know.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

DM: Dan’s Silverleaf is my home. They’ve treated me like a king since I moved here. It’s the best sounding room. I couldn’t live without Dan’s and everyone involved with it.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

DM: Siamese, Claire Morales, Bawcomville, and Jake Paleschic

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

DM: I’m probably wearing Superman underwear most of the time.

Thanks a bunch to Daniel Markham for getting this back to me so promptly and giving some really informative answers. I feel like we really got to the heart of this emerging artist. Keep an eye out. Daniel will be performing at Sundown at Granada Theater on Dec 4. Get tickets here and check out his most recent album, Pretty Bitchin’ below, along with his recent Halloween record with Claire Morales, Harmony in Hell.

Photo Credit: Karlo X. Ramos

Better Know an Artist (Vol 16): Stefan Prigmore

Stefan Prigmore’s is a name I’ve heard from the mouths of many of Fort Worth’s songwriters. He’s a real songwriter’s songwriter. He has a passion for crafting a good song and he really pours his heart into the songs he writes. Stefan sat down and answered those questions we all know and love.

Me: For starters, tell us a little about yourself. How did you first get into music? And when did you know this is what you want to do for a living (money be damned)?

SP: The main reason I got into music, and the reason it’s so important to me today, is because of my father. He was a professional musician (drums/percussion) for most of his life. He got me started learning rudiments when I was 11, and coached me as I began playing percussion in concert band in junior high. When I was 13, he and I joined the Texas Old Guard Drum & Fife Corps. We built all of the drums for the corps and my father wrote all of our marching cadences. I went on to learn guitar, and at 16, started sitting in on bass with different country and blues groups that my father played with around North Texas. Right around that time is when I started trying to write my own material. I started playing coffee shops doing Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson covers, with a few of my own scattered in as they come along. The other kids at school always were kind of taken aback when I told anyone I was gigging; there weren’t many other kids around working steady (at music) on weekends. I didn’t really realize until much later how lucky I was to grow up with such a built-in education in being a working musician. Right after high school, I hit the road hitchhiking with my buddy, Jonathan Brinkley, who is one of the best singers I’ve ever known. We traveled around for a few years playing music on the street in whatever town we were in for tips. I think that’s about the time I realized I may be able to do this for a living….but would probably be broke most of the time.

Me: How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard it before?

SP: I’ve always said I play folk music, because it encompasses so many of the styles I most enjoy, like blues, country, bluegrass, and zydeco. I grew up around a lot of great stuff from everything I just described to jazz like Monk, classic rock like Zeppelin and Leon Russell, and lots of classic soul and R&B. All of that stuff sticks with me still, and I like to think it all gets a healthy nod in my music.

Me: Who are some of your biggest musical influences, and why?

SP: My father is definitely my biggest influence, by a ridiculous margin. If it weren’t for him, I wouldn’t be doing any of this. His guidance and support when I was young and through now has been a sort of compass for me. All my favorite older tunes (Night Life, From a Jack to a King, Song for You, Ball and Chain/Janis Joplin) are songs I cut my teeth on playing bass with his band or songs that he always had blasting around the house.

Me: Which of your songs means the most ot you, and if you don’t mind me asking, why?

SP: It feels like “Brazos in My Bones” has the largest share of my soul invested. It was written partly about an ugly, horrible incident involving an extended family member, and partly about growing up experiencing the outdoors with my family and how those two themes have tied me and my brothers to that river. The darker parts of that song were difficult for me to voice, but the other came easy and warm.

Me: If you could open for any act, dead or alive, who would it be, and why?

SP: Janis Joplin, no contest. She’s almost a goddess to me.

Me: Any favorite new musical acts, local or otherwise?

SP: My favorite these days is Garrett Owen, and I’m blessed to get to share the stage with him lately and experience his music from feet away. He’s got a new album coming out soon, produced by Taylor Tatsch, and it’s goose bumps good. If Chet Baker and Paul Simon had a kid, and that kid wrote like Conor Oberst and Richard Buckner, his name would be Garrett Owen. We’re going out on tour together in mid-April. How did I get so lucky?

Me: What’s your “stranded on an island” record?

SP: My desert island record would be Professor Longhair’s Rock ‘N Roll Gumbo. I hear something I missed every time it’s on. There’s mojo in those recordings, it’d bring me luck.

Me: Moving onto the home front, what are your favorite (and least favorite) things about the DFW music scene?

SP: I generally don’t think of things in terms of “scenes”, but I really love how supportive local musicians are of each other. my least favorite thing is how unsupportive local musicians are of each other.

Me: Favorite DFW venue to play (or see a show). Why?

SP: My favorite venue is Fred’s Texas Café, hands down. They’ve worked really hard to create a good space and atmosphere. Also, when you play Fred’s, you’re always playing to some new faces that may not be the weekend-evening bar crowd, which is nice. They also take really good care of their acts.

Me: Any favorite local acts people should be looking out for?

SP: I’d keep an eye out for Melissa Ratley. She gets better every time I see her, and she’s always been great. Melissa is a country songwriter from Denton, with strong songs that lack the B.S. that genre is saturated with these days.

Me: And for shits and giggle, what’s a fun fact that most people don’t know about you?

SP: I think a lot of folks that know me may not know that I played harp for some years and it’s my favorite instrument.

Shout out to Stefan Prigmore for sitting down with me. He’s currently in residency at the Grotto along with Garrett Owen, Monday nights in February. Catch him there before he heads out on tour with Garrett. You can check out some tracks below. Thanks for reading and keep supporting local music.

Photo Credit: Steve Watkins (DFW.com)